The Daily Star, Oneonta, NY - otsego county news, delaware county news, oneonta news, oneonta sports

Breaking News

Columns

August 17, 2013

A farewell, sidewalk supervising and cheers made local news in August 1928

Oneontans said farewell to one of their esteemed residents. Two big construction projects got underway, and crowds cheered on Oneonta’s “Iron Man.” These were all part of our life and times in August 1928. 

It’s just my opinion, but when it comes time to die, it’s best when you’re in a place you enjoy. Such was the case for David Forrest Wilber, as The Oneonta Star reported on Monday, Aug. 16, 1928. 

“Hon. David Forrest Wilber, former member of congress, long engaged in the consular service of the United States and easily the most widely known and most esteemed resident of Oneonta, died at his summer camp at Upper Dam, Maine yesterday morning ... following a decline of more than a year ... having been compelled to forego his favorite pastime of fishing.”

Wilber was born in Milford in December 1859, and after his education at Milford and at the Cazenovia Seminary, he joined his father, David, and brother, George I., in the hop business of David Wilber & Sons. Young David moved to Oneonta in 1880 to open an office for the firm. He also built a brick residence at the corner of Ford Avenue and Main Street, where Community Bank is today. The house was replaced in the early 1920s by the Palace Theatre.

Wilber entered politics, serving as a county supervisor and then elected to Congress in a district made up from Otsego, Montgomery, Schoharie, Greene and Schenectady counties. Wilber served from 1895 to 1903.

President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Wilber as a Consul General at Singapore in 1903, and he was then either promoted or transferred to other countries until 1923, thereafter returning to Oneonta to care for property interests and enjoying his remaining years in travel and favorite diversions, such as fishing.

One of D.F. Wilber’s early property interests was a partnership with Reuben Reynolds and Fred Wilcox in acquiring the Yager farm, found near the top of Maple Street, and then providing the state with the site for the State Normal School, today’s State University College at Oneonta. Wilber was highly active in the development of Oneonta from 1880 to 1900.

Text Only
Big Chuck D'Imperio
Cary Brunswick

Chuck Pinkey
Guest Column

Lisa Miller

Mark Simonson

Rick Brockway

Sam Pollak
William Masters
  • Schreibman tops Chris Gibson on women's issues

    As the time to vote draws near, we need to remember how money can run politics more than we can. Raising funds is a prominent (if not the dominant) task of getting elected. Raising issues is also crucial, but those efforts are subject to distortion and fear-mongering.

    September 18, 2012

  • Republicans feelentitled to allthey can garner

    An entitlement is a legal benefit available from the government to individuals who are within a defined category of recipients, such as needing insurance for unemployment or health services.

    September 4, 2012

  • Romney focuses on self; Obama emphasizes unity

    Mitt Romney criticizes President Obama for saying a person's success is rooted in his community, and is not all his alone. Romney belittles this with his belief in individual initiative. He is better at the put-down than the push-up.

    August 21, 2012

  • Romney shows little regard for common man

    The Republicans in Congress have voted over and over, 33 times, redundantly and uselessly, to rescind what they call Obamacare.

    August 7, 2012

  • Scouts' gay ban creates problem where none exists

    The Boy Scouts of America's "emphatic reaffirmation" of its vow to exclude any and all homosexuals from its hallowed ranks is ill-considered and pathetic, especially in view of its having reviewed the matter for two years.

    July 24, 2012

Additional Content
Join the Debate
Helium
Additional Resources
CNHI News Service
Poll

Is Israel justified to conduct its military campaign against the Hamas in Gaza?

Yes
No
Undecided/no opinion
     View Results