The Daily Star, Oneonta, NY - otsego county news, delaware county news, oneonta news, oneonta sports

Community News Network

June 26, 2013

Novel vaccine fights Type 1 diabetes by stopping immune attack

NEW YORK — An experimental vaccine designed to tamp down the abnormal immune response that causes Type 1 diabetes helped preserve patients' insulin-producing cells in a study that may change the way the disease is treated.

Researchers from Stanford University in California and Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands created a vaccine that selectively targets the destructive immune cells and stops their attack. The data, from the second of three stages of tests generally needed for regulatory approval, were published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Type 1 diabetes is caused when the body's immune system destroys insulin-releasing cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, requiring patients to inject themselves with insulin replacement therapy. Scientists have long sought a treatment approach that targets the cause of the disease.

"Although insulin saves people's lives and was discovered 100 years ago, we need something better than that," Lawrence Steinman, a professor at Stanford School of Medicine near Palo Alto, Calif., and an author of the study, said in a telephone interview. "One of the long sought-after goals of immunological therapy is to do just this, antigen-specific modulation."

Type 1 diabetes, also called juvenile diabetes, affects as many as 3 million people in the U.S., according to JDRF, an organization that funds research for the disease. It's less common than Type 2 diabetes, which develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or the pancreas stops producing enough insulin, and is linked to excess weight.

The compound, called TOL-3021, boosted the function of pancreatic beta cells and specifically reduced the killer immune cells implicit in Type 1 diabetes.

The trial was done in 80 patients ages 18 to 40 who had been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes within 5 years. Patients were given an injection of the compound or placebo once a week for 12 weeks, and researchers looked at levels of C-peptide as a marker of the function of insulin-producing beta cells.

Text Only
Local News -
  • April activities abound at Thanksgiving Home There were many April fool jokes played here at Clara Welch Thanksgiving Home on April 1. Some of us found our door name plates turned upside down or swapped with one from another door and furniture and objects were mysteriously moved around in our rooms. The dining room was completely transformed from its usual formal setting into a hodpodge of mismatched china and … horrors, plastic tablecloths and paper napkins. Each table was decorated with a different theme, Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Easter. Christmas carols played in the background. We suspect that Dee Bouck, of Personal Care and John Santello, Activities Director, were mainly responsible for this mayhem.

    April 24, 2014

  • Major faults revealed by spring
  • Big crowd sees Easter Bunny arrive
  • Armistice reached?
  • Milford takes two from CV-S
Additional Content
Join the Debate
Helium
Additional Resources
CNHI News Service
Poll

Are you more or less religious than your parents?

More religious
Less religious
About the same
     View Results