The Daily Star, Oneonta, NY - otsego county news, delaware county news, oneonta news, oneonta sports

December 7, 2012

Step Back in Time: Dec. 7, 2012

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The Daily Star

---- — Step Back in Time features news items from The Daily Star 25 and 50 years ago.

25 years ago

Dec. 7,Text ColorSwatch/NoneStrokeStyle/$ID/SolidText ColorSwatch/NoneStrokeStyle/$ID/Solid$ID/NothingText ColorText Color$ID/NothingText ColorText Color 1987

Oneonta Storytellers took their stories to the public Sunday afternoon, offering five Christmas tales to children and adults at Hartwick College’s Yager Museum. Storytelling is becoming a more cherished form of communication, according to one of the tellers.

“Every time a story is told in a different country it gains the thumb print of that society,” said Barbara Onasch of Delhi, one of the group’s 14 members. She told the story, “Everyman Heart Lay Down,” which she said originated in Liberia.

Mary Smith, another storyteller, told the tale, “White Christmas Trees Will Never Be Perfect.”

Sunday’s performance was the group’s third Christmas show in the area.

Mrs. Onasch began her interest in telling stories as a children’s librarian in Delhi, she said. “I realized it’s a powerful, powerful thing.”

Storytelling is frequently more meaningful for adults than for children, she said. “Storytelling was the thing that adults did at night when there was no TV.”

There has been a resurgence of storytelling “as people are getting fed up with TV,” she said.

 

50 years ago

Dec. 7,Text ColorSwatch/NoneStrokeStyle/$ID/SolidText ColorSwatch/NoneStrokeStyle/$ID/Solid$ID/NothingText ColorText Color$ID/NothingText ColorText Color 1962

HANCOCK (Special) — This community received an economic setback Thursday when the Endicott Coil Co. closed down its local plant.

The company, which had been operating in the village since April 1961, manufactured electric coils.

S.D. Mason, owner and operator, as well as president of the company, with headquarters and a plant in Binghamton, has been reported as saying the reason for the closing of the Hancock plant was that the operation of the establishment was no longer profitable.

Forty persons were employed at the plant when production was at its height, but when the plant closed Friday, the payroll included but 18 women.

Stephen Foldes, chief engineer for the Endicott Coil Company, speaking for the firm, said, “the reason the plant was closed was that the amount of work anticipated did not materialize.”

It was through the efforts of the Hancock Industrial Development Corporation that the Binghamton firm opened its branch factory in Hancock.

The local development organization now faces the problem of endeavoring to bring to Hancock another industry to occupy the plant.