The Daily Star, Oneonta, NY - otsego county news, delaware county news, oneonta news, oneonta sports

Senior scene

January 18, 2014

Social Security: At tax time, make sure your Social Security information is in order

Happy 2014! With the arrival of the new year and the start of tax season, it is the perfect time to share some helpful information from a fellow Social Security employee.

Wise taxpayers may want to take advantage of winter months indoors to prepare for tax filing season this spring. Whether you are a small-business owner, a retiree, or a new parent, here are some Social Security tax tips that may help you.

Are Social Security benefits taxable? Yes, for some people with higher incomes. About one-third of those receiving Social Security benefits must pay taxes on some of their Social Security benefits, depending on the amount of their taxable income. Learn more at www.socialsecurity.gov/planners/taxes.htm.

Will I get a tax form for my Social Security benefits? Yes. Beneficiaries should receive their Social Security Benefit Statements (Form SSA-1099) for tax year 2013 on or before Jan. 31. If you receive Social Security and don’t receive your 1099 by the end of January, you can request one online at www.socialsecurity.gov/1099.

We had a baby in 2013. Does our child need a Social Security number? Yes. Most people apply for their baby’s Social Security number while they’re still in the hospital at the same time they register for the birth certificate. But if you didn’t, you’ll need to apply for your child’s Social Security number before you file your tax return to claim the child as a dependent.  You’ll also need it if you ever apply for government benefits on behalf of your child or your family. Learn more about Social Security cards and numbers at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber.

I changed my name when I got married last year. Do I need to report it to Social Security? Yes. If you’ve legally changed your name due to marriage, divorce, court order, or for any other reason, make sure you change your name with Social Security, as well as with your employer. If you change with one source but not the other, it could cause your earnings to be improperly recorded and you may not get all the benefits you are entitled to when you become eligible for Social Security in the future. Failing to change your name on your Social Security record could also cause a delay in your receipt of any federal income tax refund. You can learn more about your Social Security number and how to change your name at www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber.

Text Only
Senior scene

Additional Content
Join the Debate
Helium
Additional Resources
CNHI News Service
Poll

Do you plan to attend the Baseball Hall of Fame Induction?

Yes
No
Not sure
     View Results